25th Year Of VKIC Celebration : Sanskriti Anveshak 2021

VKIC takes the pleasure in inviting you to a year long interactive session in its Sanskriti Anveshak Forum. This forum is an interdisciplinary forum, where we have theme based interactive sessions.

Our forthcoming Sanskriti Anveshak (SA) Session is on the theme ‘Development through Culture: nature-culture-wellbeing fostering sustainable development’ and is being planned virtually through the CISCO Webex platform starting from 30 March 2021.

The first session will be on the following topic.

Call For Papers : Traditional Ecological Knowledge and Culture of Agriculture in the Communities of Northeast India

The agriculture sector of India in contemporary times faces two challenges. One, intensification of land use to raise food production for the rising population, and two, the challenges posed by natural resource degradation and climate change caused particularly by variable rainfall and extreme weather events.

VKIC 24th Ceremony of Foundation Day 2020

VKIC Foundation Day and Book Release Function 2020 The Vivekananda Kendra Institute of culture celebrated today its glorious 24th Foundation day on 31st Jan 2020 at WM Auditorium of   VKIC premise Uzan Bazar Guwahati.The celebration started with Manglacharan. The programme was attended by dignitaries, invitees, eminent personalities and Vivekanand Kendra’s Karyakakarta of Assam The Report of Activities was presented by VKIC depicting its vision and the work done by the Institute during the year 2019. Dr. P.C. Bhattacharya, Director (RAC) of VKIC delivered the welcome address.

Thirty Three Koti Divinities

A popular but unfounded belief has been spread that Hindus have thirty-three crore (33,00,00,000) gods. It is a misunderstanding of the Vedic concept of the State, and hence a misinterpretation of the word koti. Thirty-three divinities are mentioned in the Yajur-Veda, Atharva Veda, áatapatha-Brāhmana and in other Vedic and later texts. The number thirty-three occurs with reference to divinities in the Parsi scriptures of Avesta as well.

Marriage Rituals and Customs in the Jain Community

In Jaina tradition, as in all Indian communities, marriage is a community event as not only two individuals, but two families are united. Until, and sometimes after, marriage, children generally live with their parents, and it is the parents’ responsibility to introduce them [perhaps with the help of suitable intermediaries] to prospective marriage partners. It is quite misleading to refer to this as arranged marriage – in practice, the couple has every opportunity over a long period to get to know each other, and the decision to marry belongs to them alone.